The American Chess Champion Paul Morphy

At least from his early-middle-aged years until he died in 1884, Paul Morphy reportedly considered chess an amateur activity, not to be pursued as a profession. Yet in his younger years he played many chess games, even defeating adults when he was a small child.

He won the first American Chess Congress in 1857, with the following score:

14 wins

1 loss

3 draws

Perhaps even more rare than the 14-to-1 win/loss ratio (draws did not count in 1857), Morphy refused the cash prize after winning the tournament, very rare for a chess master.

chess tournament in 1857The 18 contestants in the first American Chess Congress (Morphy in the middle of right column)

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Chess Games in Europe (1858-1859)

According to Wikipedia, Paul Morphy’s record in Europe was as follows (not including casual games, only formal matches, none of which he lost):

38 wins

11 loses

8 draws

After winning so many games against many of the best European chess masters, Paul Morphy was often proclaimed, by those who saw his victories, the champion of the world.

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Super master Paul Morphy of New Orleans

Paul Morphy – American chess champion

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Chess Book for Beginners

. . . new paperback book, about to be published, really is for the early beginner, the player who knows the rules of chess but almost nothing else about the game.

Free E-Book on Paul Morphy

The [Chess] Congress was advertised to open on the 6th of October [1857] . . . First of all came Judge Meek, of Alabama . . . Soon after him followed Mr. Louis Paulsen . . .

Chess for Children

In a study by the New York City Schools, it was found that “Chess dramatically improves a child’s ability to think rationally . . . increases cognitive skills . . . improves children’s communication skills . . .”

A Chess Puzzle

Clear understanding of the influences of chess pieces [how they can move] can here make an apparently difficult problem easy to solve.

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